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EDITOR'S LETTER
A new era
NEWS FEATURE 1
A deadly profession: Being a journalist in Mexico
NEWS FEATURE 2
In Trump, the Koch brothers see both friend and foe
DIGEST AMERICAS
Yet another corruption scandal in Brazil tarnishes Temer’s presidency
DIGEST AMERICAS
Tech giants team up to fight terrorism
DIGEST EUROPE
A ‘unique opportunity’ for peace in Cyprus
DIGEST EUROPE
Is France getting a taste of what centrism really means?
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Twenty years on, ‘One Country, Two Systems’ is caught in an impasse
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Jostling for position on the India-China border
DIGEST AFRICA
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, football is more than just a game
DIGEST AFRICA
Kenya’s government looks to cash in on gambling
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Al-Qaeda, secret prisons and a military base in Eritrea: The UAE’s Yemen endeavour
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Residents of Mosul celebrate first Eid without Islamic State in years
THE PICTURE
Left in the dark
GOOD NEWS
Over $350 million raised for South Sudanese refugees
Panama's second-largest city gets continuous access to potable water
THE  INFOGRAPHIC
That's old news
IN SCIENCE
New memory erasure research gives hope to PTSD sufferers
IN MEDICINE
Groundbreaking discovery confirms existence of orbiting supermassive black holes
IN TECHNOLOGY
Chemical warfare: Birds use cigarette butts to fight parasites
www.wired.com
A Rare Journey Into the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, a Super-Bunker That Can Survive Anything
www.theguardian.com
How Alexandria's 'leaning tower' became an emblem of the city's corruption
www.politico.eu
Greece fears revival of far-left violence

The people decide

I t’s election season: France is embroiled in as tight a race as ever with people going to the polls on Sunday in an election that could change not only the nature of France but Europe as a whole. British Prime Minister Theresa May went back on her promise that there would be no general election until 2020, calling snap polls for June to strengthen her mandate for the upcoming Brexit negotiations. In the US state of Georgia, a Democrat won the first round in a race that many have painted as a referendum on President Donald Trump’s performance in office so far. Elections in Jakarta, Indonesia, are widely seen as a test of religious tolerance in the world’s largest Muslim-majority nation.
In Turkey, the choice on Sunday was simple on the surface: ‘Evet’ or ‘Hayir’, Yes or No. But the implications of the victory for the Yes camp, approving constitutional changes, and the way it came about are far from the only thing at stake. The opposition cried foul from early on, calling for the results to be annulled, but so far there is no sign a rerun will be granted despite concerns voiced by election observers.
President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is set to extend his grip on power, in the eyes of many deepening a trend towards authoritarianism in a country so often hailed as a bridge between East and West.
In any election or referendum, there are bound to be winners and losers, that’s the nature of democracy. However, what is not the nature of democracy is preventing one side from campaigning fairly and freely. That was the case in Turkey, as our Europe Editor Joseph Wallace explores in this week’s cover story. The impact of Mr. Erdogan’s victory is far-reaching.
The people decide, but they need to be able to do so on an equal playing field.
Manuel Langendorf, 
Editor-in-Chief, The World Weekly 
Editor's Letter
20 April 2017 - last edited 20 April 2017
Editor-in-Chief / Middle East Editor: Manuel Langendorf
manuel@theworldweekly.com

Associate Editor / Europe Editor: Joe Wallace
joseph@theworldweekly.com

Asia-Pacific Editor:
Tim Cross
tim@theworldweekly.com

Africa Editor: Kasper Loftin
kasper@theworldweekly.com

Americas Editor: Henry Goodwin
henry@theworldweekly.com

Staff writer: Marta Rodmarti
marta@theworldweekly.com

Staff writer: Alastair McCready
alastair@theworldweekly.com
Managing Director: Rory O’grady
rory@theworldweekly.com

Chairman: John Spearman

CTO: Christos Athanasiadis

Front-end Developer: Giorgos Sideris​

Back-end Developer: Fran Alvarez

Art Director: Tyrone Barton

Picture Editor: Amir Mohammad