contents
Your weekly briefing on the state of 
humanity
SEE ALL ISSUES
EDITOR'S LETTER
A new era
NEWS FEATURE 1
A deadly profession: Being a journalist in Mexico
NEWS FEATURE 2
In Trump, the Koch brothers see both friend and foe
DIGEST AMERICAS
Yet another corruption scandal in Brazil tarnishes Temer’s presidency
DIGEST AMERICAS
Tech giants team up to fight terrorism
DIGEST EUROPE
A ‘unique opportunity’ for peace in Cyprus
DIGEST EUROPE
Is France getting a taste of what centrism really means?
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Twenty years on, ‘One Country, Two Systems’ is caught in an impasse
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Jostling for position on the India-China border
DIGEST AFRICA
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, football is more than just a game
DIGEST AFRICA
Kenya’s government looks to cash in on gambling
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Al-Qaeda, secret prisons and a military base in Eritrea: The UAE’s Yemen endeavour
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Residents of Mosul celebrate first Eid without Islamic State in years
THE PICTURE
Left in the dark
GOOD NEWS
Over $350 million raised for South Sudanese refugees
Panama's second-largest city gets continuous access to potable water
THE  INFOGRAPHIC
That's old news
IN SCIENCE
New memory erasure research gives hope to PTSD sufferers
IN MEDICINE
Groundbreaking discovery confirms existence of orbiting supermassive black holes
IN TECHNOLOGY
Chemical warfare: Birds use cigarette butts to fight parasites
www.wired.com
A Rare Journey Into the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, a Super-Bunker That Can Survive Anything
www.theguardian.com
How Alexandria's 'leaning tower' became an emblem of the city's corruption
www.politico.eu
Greece fears revival of far-left violence
GOOD NEWS
Tropical diseases are being treated at an unprecedented rate
T he World Health Organisation has reported that major progress has been made in the treatment of neglected tropical diseases since 2007, with an unprecedented 1 billion people receiving treatment in 2015 alone. Political support, generous donations of medicines and improvements in living conditions have led to these great advancements. 
Rain for famine-struck Somalia
After a year of drought, important ‘long rains’ are forecast to arrive in Somalia imminently. Drought is not the only reason for famine in the country, but rainfall will ease the woes of farmers in the region, who have been struggling since it stopped raining last year.
New plan to protect and valorise Colombia’s rich biodiversity
International researchers led by the British Earlham Institute have created a multidisciplinary network to study, promote and preserve Colombia’s plant and animal life, which represents 10% of the planet’s biodiversity. Colombia’s abundance of flora and fauna could be used as a tool to fight starvation and malnutrition. 
HIV self-tests available from Chinese vending machines
Students at the Harbin Medical University in northern China are now able to purchase HIV self-testing kits from the same vending machines that sell soft-drinks and noodles. Proponents hope that the discrete nature of vending machines will produce higher detection and lower transmission rates.
Progress in removing viruses from wastewater
Researchers from Israel and the US have developed a new technique to improve the process by which viruses are removed from treated wastewater used for drinking in water-scarce cities. Waterborne viruses can cause a wide range of illnesses, some of them deadly.
Kaspar Loftin, Manuel Langendorf, Alastair McCready & Marta Rodríguez
Good News
20 April 2017 - last edited 20 April 2017