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Your weekly briefing on the state of 
humanity
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EDITOR'S LETTER
Our world this week
NEWS FEATURE 1
Central governments and cryptocurrency: an unlikely pairing?
NEWS FEATURE 2
America's forgotten crisis
NEWS FEATURE 3
Why peace continues to elude South Sudan
NEWS FEATURE 4
President Macron’s planned ‘fake news’ crackdown stokes fears over free speech
www.theguardian.com
Lost language: how Macau gambled away its past
www.egyptindependent.com
Transgender in Egypt: the forbidden life - Egypt Independent
news.trust.org
Tap and donate: How a cashless society is creating jobs for the homeless
GOOD NEWS
Tropical diseases are being treated at an unprecedented rate
T he World Health Organisation has reported that major progress has been made in the treatment of neglected tropical diseases since 2007, with an unprecedented 1 billion people receiving treatment in 2015 alone. Political support, generous donations of medicines and improvements in living conditions have led to these great advancements. 
Rain for famine-struck Somalia
After a year of drought, important ‘long rains’ are forecast to arrive in Somalia imminently. Drought is not the only reason for famine in the country, but rainfall will ease the woes of farmers in the region, who have been struggling since it stopped raining last year.
New plan to protect and valorise Colombia’s rich biodiversity
International researchers led by the British Earlham Institute have created a multidisciplinary network to study, promote and preserve Colombia’s plant and animal life, which represents 10% of the planet’s biodiversity. Colombia’s abundance of flora and fauna could be used as a tool to fight starvation and malnutrition. 
HIV self-tests available from Chinese vending machines
Students at the Harbin Medical University in northern China are now able to purchase HIV self-testing kits from the same vending machines that sell soft-drinks and noodles. Proponents hope that the discrete nature of vending machines will produce higher detection and lower transmission rates.
Progress in removing viruses from wastewater
Researchers from Israel and the US have developed a new technique to improve the process by which viruses are removed from treated wastewater used for drinking in water-scarce cities. Waterborne viruses can cause a wide range of illnesses, some of them deadly.
Kaspar Loftin, Manuel Langendorf, Alastair McCready & Marta Rodríguez
Good News
20 April 2017 - last edited 20 April 2017