contents
Your weekly briefing on the state of 
humanity
SEE ALL ISSUES
EDITOR'S LETTER
The people decide
NEWS FEATURE 1
Raising the stakes: Trump and Kim edge closer to nuclear war
NEWS FEATURE 2
Facebook's identity crisis
DIGEST AMERICAS
The arrests of two fugitive governors arouse suspicion in Mexico
DIGEST AMERICAS
Will the Odebrecht corruption scandal bury Lula’s legend?
DIGEST EUROPE
France’s four-horse election race leaves Europe in the balance
DIGEST EUROPE
Britain gears up for a snap Brexit election
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Trump signals lethal intent with the ‘Mother of All Bombs’
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Vigilante justice reigns strong in Pakistan
DIGEST AFRICA
Road rage in Zambia: Opposition leader faces treason charge
DIGEST AFRICA
A report adds to the controversy over Ethiopia's Oromo protests
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Palestinian prisoners go on mass hunger strike
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Syria’s ‘four towns’ evacuation deal turns into a massacre
THE PICTURE
A baptism of fireworks
GOOD NEWS
Tropical diseases are being treated at an unprecedented rate
Rain for famine-struck Somalia
THE  INFOGRAPHIC
Where on Earth did that come from?
IN SCIENCE
Can drugs really take you to a higher state of consciousness?
IN MEDICINE
Three-foot ‘giant worm’ discovered in Philippines
IN TECHNOLOGY
On a frozen Saturn moon, the ingredients for life
www.theguardian.com
Chechens tell of prison beatings and electric shocks in anti-gay purge: ‘They called us animals’
www.middleeasteye.net
For women only: Coffee, billiards and cards in Gaza cafe
www.bbc.co.uk
Living with the dead - BBC News

Britain gears up for a snap Brexit election

Brexit
See 57 more
Prime Minister Theresa May announces a snap election, which will be held on June 8.
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Prime Minister Theresa May announces a snap election, which will be held on June 8.
B renda from Bristol spoke for many people in the UK when, asked by the BBC how she felt about a third national vote in as many years, she exclaimed: “You’re joking. Not another one! Oh for God’s sake, I can’t stand this.”
For nine months after becoming prime minister last July, Theresa May and her allies repeated that there would be no snap general election despite the fact that her government was almost completely different from the one elected in 2015.
Then, as the country got sleepily back to work after the Easter weekend on Tuesday morning, Ms. May emerged from Number 10 Downing Street and told reporters that “the only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead” was to hold an election on June 8.
Why the rethink? Ms. May said that whereas the country was coming together behind Brexit, opposition politicians were trying to sabotage it. In fact, polls show that voters are as divided as they were last June over leaving the EU, while the bill triggering divorce talks easily passed through Parliament unamended.
Nonetheless, Ms. May’s Conservatives hold only a thin majority in the House of Commons. Amber Rudd, the home secretary, hinted in a BBC interview that the prime minister wanted leeway in case she makes more concessions to the EU than eurosceptic backbenchers had hoped and they rebel against the final deal (if one is reached). Equally, pro-EU Tories such as Anna Soubry and Ken Clarke might vote against a particularly harsh agreement.
Either way, Ms. May is set for a bumper majority, which would also help her push through controversial domestic measures such as school and tax reforms. One recent poll gave the Conservatives a 21-point lead over Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party. Electoral Calculus, a nonpartisan group that crunches survey data, predicts that Labour will have its worst performance since 1935.
One consolation for Mr. Corbyn is that the UK Independence Party, until recently considered a threat in northern working-class seats, is in disarray. Meanwhile, the Liberal Democrats are expected to take back some Conservative constituencies which voted to remain in the EU.
Ultimately, Ms. May’s aim is probably to push the next general election back from 2020 to 2022. That way, it will not be held immediately after Brexit takes effect.
Joe Wallace
The World Weekly
20 April 2017 - last edited 6 days ago