contents
Your weekly briefing on the state of 
humanity
SEE ALL ISSUES
EDITOR'S LETTER
The starting gun
NEWS FEATURE 1
Russia’s youth awakens
NEWS FEATURE 2
Britain steps into the Brexit void
DIGEST AMERICAS
Trumpcare falls victim to Republican civil war
DIGEST AMERICAS
How a Colombian town defied one of the world’s largest mining corporations
DIGEST AMERICAS
One of Latin America’s longest-running diplomatic disputes heats up again
DIGEST EUROPE
Saarland punctures the Schulz bubble
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Commerce and combat, China’s twin levers in the Pacific
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Beijing’s shadow continues to loom over Hong Kong
DIGEST AFRICA
Bulldozing dissent in Tanzania
DIGEST AFRICA
A bloody week in the Democratic Republic of Congo
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Buried under the rubble: Civilian casualties spike in Mosul
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Two years of war have wrecked Yemen, but no end is in sight
THE PICTURE
One last time, Wimbledon goes to the dogs
GOOD NEWS
Facial recognition software improves the diagnosis of rare genetic disease
New technology allows paralysed man to use his hand again
THE  INFOGRAPHIC
Gaming for living
IN SCIENCE
‘World-first’ procedure lets a paralysed man use his hand
IN MEDICINE
How forcing defunct cells to self-destruct could reverse signs of ageing
IN TECHNOLOGY
Solar shield, the controversial new solution to climate change
GOOD NEWS
A selection of positive news from around the world this week.
Boko Haram captives released in Cameroon
B oko Haram’s activities in northern Cameroon are rarely mentioned. This week the national government said it had successfully captured one of the insurgent group’s strongholds in the Mandara mountains and freed at least 5,000 hostages, including elderly people, women and children.
Afghan forces free dozens of people imprisoned by the Taliban
On Monday, Afghanistan’s special forces freed 32 people imprisoned in a Taliban camp in the southern Helmand province, where most districts are under insurgent control. The Ministry of Defence confirmed that four of the prisoners were policemen and the rest were civilians.
FARC makes love not war
Dozens of babies have reportedly been born and many others are on their way at the transitional camps where around 7,000 FARC rebels gathered after laying down their arms as part of last year’s peace deal. For many, the idea of starting a family during the war was unthinkable; now they are seizing on the peace to experience parenthood.
Three decades on, Africa gets its own domain name
Taking pan-Africanism into the 21st century, this week the continent got its own Internet domain name. The web adress .africa was launched by the African Union in the hope that the continent will be brought together as “an Internet community”.
First ever sickle cell sufferer cured
A teenager diagnosed with sickle cell anaemia, an inherited blood disorder, has achieved complete remission after being the first person to undergo a new gene-editing treatment at Necker Children’s Hospital in Paris. The success of this experimental treatment gives hope to sufferers of sickle cell - the most common gene disorder in the world, which until now has been incurable. 
China gives sanctuary to Siberian tigers and Amur leopards
China plans to complete a “comprehensive plan and pilot” for a new national park in the northeastern regions of Jilin and Heilongjiang by 2020. The aim is to provide a sanctuary for two species on the brink of of extinction: Siberian tigers and Amur leopards.
Kaspar Loftin & Marta Rodríguez
Good News
16 March 2017 - last edited 16 March 2017