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On Refugee Week
NEWS FEATURE 1
Picking up the pieces after the Grenfell Tower tragedy
NEWS FEATURE 2
Going against the Asian flow, South Korea axes nuclear power
DIGEST AMERICAS
Trump on Cuba: Tough talk, moderate action
DIGEST AMERICAS
Amazon and Whole Foods: ‘Love at first sight’
DIGEST EUROPE
Are Europe’s elites divided and out of touch?
DIGEST EUROPE
A corruption saga topples Romania’s government
DIGEST EUROPE
FIFA’s new rule to fight racism in football
DIGEST EUROPE
Does Theresa May’s gamble risk peace in Northern Ireland?
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Thailand continues social media crackdown
DIGEST AFRICA
Smooth criminal? Equatorial Guinea’s heir apparent goes on trial
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
A palace reshuffle in Riyadh
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
The sands are shifting in eastern Syria
THE PICTURE
A forest of fire
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DELL will recycle plastic waste from Haiti’s beaches for laptop packaging
A cholesterol-lowering vaccine could be imminent
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Humanity on the move
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China kicks off a quantum space race
IN MEDICINE
Archaeologists discover a lost Ethiopian city
IN TECHNOLOGY
Can your father’s age determine your intelligence?
www.spiegel.de
A German Giant: The Political Legacy of Helmut Kohl - SPIEGEL ONLINE - International
roadsandkingdoms.com
Living to the Rhythm of the Race - Roads & Kingdoms
www.bbc.co.uk
Chicago goes high-tech in search of answers to gun crime surge - BBC News

Dispatch from northern Iraq

A s Iraqi forces push deeper into western Mosul, Islamic State’s last urban stronghold in the country, more and more people are fleeing its reign of terror.
I travelled to northern Iraq to assess the human toll, but also the sense of liberation as inhabitants flee to safety.
Less than 30 kilometres from western Mosul, one elderly woman said the past few weeks had been extremely trying, marked by hunger and thirst. “We even forgot what tea looks like,” she told The World Weekly, sitting on the muddied ground in the Hammam al-Alil refugee camp, where she had arrived earlier in the day.
As buses reached the crowded reception site, more people shared their painful experiences. Many had made large parts of the journey from Mosul on foot, some even without shoes.
Politicians and analysts agree that IS needs to be defeated in a variety of ways, first and foremost militarily and ideologically.
But Iraq faces another enormous challenge: making sure those who have left everything behind can return as soon as possible to what is left of their homes (if they wish to) and are adequately housed for as long as the conflict continues.
Read our full investigation in the coming weeks.
Manuel Langendorf,
Editor-in-Chief, The World Weekly
Editor's Letter
16 March 2017 - last edited 16 March 2017
Editor-in-Chief / Middle East Editor: Manuel Langendorf
manuel@theworldweekly.com

Associate Editor / Europe Editor: Joe Wallace
joseph@theworldweekly.com

Asia-Pacific Editor:
Tim Cross
tim@theworldweekly.com

Africa Editor: Kasper Loftin
kasper@theworldweekly.com

Americas Editor: Henry Goodwin
henry@theworldweekly.com

Staff writer: Marta Rodmarti
marta@theworldweekly.com

Staff writer: Alastair McCready
alastair@theworldweekly.com
Managing Director: Rory O’grady
rory@theworldweekly.com

Chairman: John Spearman

CTO: Christos Athanasiadis

Front-end Developer: Giorgos Sideris​

Back-end Developer: Fran Alvarez

Art Director: Tyrone Barton

Picture Editor: Amir Mohammad
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