contents
Your weekly briefing on the state of 
humanity
SEE ALL ISSUES
EDITOR'S LETTER
The 'other'
NEWS FEATURE 1
Is President Trump on the brink of a new Watergate?
NEWS FEATURE 2
Playing with Greek fire
DIGEST AMERICAS
No Trump bump for Twitter’s profits
DIGEST EUROPE
Fed up with taking the flak, Brussels launches a revamp
DIGEST EUROPE
Martin Schulz’s bid to topple Merkel hits turbulence
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Did Kim Jong-un order his own half-brother’s assassination?
DIGEST ASIA-PACIFIC
Kim’s missiles pose a major foreign policy challenge for Trump
DIGEST AFRICA
Former Liberian warlord Charles Taylor phones allies from UK prison
DIGEST AFRICA
The resignation of a general shines further light on the atrocities in South Sudan
DIGEST AFRICA
Armyworms and drought threaten millions of people in southern and eastern Africa
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Siege, chemical weapons and misinformation: How Assad broke Aleppo
DIGEST MIDDLE EAST
Is the two-state solution dead and buried?
THE PICTURE
Basking in a purifying golden glow
GOOD NEWS
Testing for Ebola in 15 mins
Malaysian aid for Rohingyas arrives in Bangladesh
THE  INFOGRAPHIC
People in numbers
IN SCIENCE
De-extinction: Not such a mammoth task?
IN MEDICINE
Why are we so bad at remembering details?
IN TECHNOLOGY
A white dwarf star contains the building blocks for life
roadsandkingdoms.com
The Friendliest Border - Roads & Kingdoms
foreignpolicy.com
The Blackwater of Jihad
africanarguments.org
The Strong Breed: The rise and fall of Africa’s great literary leaders | African Arguments

IS lashes out in Iraq as the onslaught on Mosul rumbles on

Islamic State
See 165 more
People gather at the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City area on January 2, 2017.
Murtadha Sudani/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
People gather at the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City area on January 2, 2017.
I t was a bloody turn of the year for Iraqis. A wave of attacks by Islamic State (IS) militants hit cities in various parts of the country, killing dozens of people within days.
The group struck Baghdad several times, including a bomb blast in the predominantly Shia Sadr City district of the capital. Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi told reporters that the attacker pretended to pick up day labourers in his explosives-laden truck. Another car bomb exploded in the car park of a nearby hospital. In total, five car bombs hit the city on Monday alone. 
Speaking to The World Weekly from Baghdad, Iraqi journalist Mustafa Habib, who writes for the news website Niqash, said the situation had become “scary” but that Iraqis were now used to bombings. Nonetheless, a local media outlet reported dismay on social media that the New Year’s Day shooting in Istanbul attracted sympathy around the world, whereas the “daily pain” suffered by Iraqi civilians was ignored.
The blasts came as further progress was made against IS in Mosul, its main urban stronghold, where grueling battles continue and more than 2,000 people flee the violence each day. "The terrorists will attempt to attack civilians in order to make up for their losses, but we assure the Iraqi people and the world that we are able to end terrorism," Mr. al-Abadi told reporters.  
Many observers agree that the violence is a prelude of what is to come as IS loses ground. “The organisation is likely to continue its shift to asymmetrical guerilla-style military tactics that target civilian populations in various cities - a far cry from its 2014 attempt to act as a state army that conquers territories,” Renad Mansour, an academy fellow at Chatham House, told TWW. 
Mr. Habib said sleeper cells, whom he blamed for the latest bombings, will increase their activity in the future, “taking advantage of political conflicts and... corruption among the security forces inside Baghdad and other cities”. 
Yet amid the prevailing gloom there was some good news emerging from Iraq this week, as a local female journalist who had been abducted by armed men in December was freed unharmed.
Manuel Langendorf
The World Weekly
05 January 2017 - last edited today